Common Kilt Questions

Purchasing a kilt is an investment for life. Whether for a special occasion or just to have, there are understandably a lot of questions that may crop up prior to making your kilt purchase. These questions range from specifics of the kilt itself, to queries on which tartan to go for. This blog will answer the most common questions about kilts, and therefore hopefully help with your decision making when purchasing an outfit from MacGregor and MacDuff

Which Tartan should you select?

The first question we usually get asked by our customers is in regards to which tartan they should go for. A common concern is the myth that you need to purchase your clan tartan. This was a tradition for Highlanders, as the tartan you wore would identify which clan you were part of. However, this is an outdated rule that no longer applies when purchasing your kilt. There are now thousands of tartans to choose from, from clan specific to a range of modern designs. Although it is still special to wear your own clan tartan; with 4,000 tartans to decide between, from three different mills we work with – the decision can be made purely on which tartan is your favourite!

 

What are your options?

There are several different options for your kilt, including the amount of cloth that is used to create it; but what is the real difference? At MacGregor and MacDuff, we will always measure our customers for an 8 yard kilt, which is approximately 7.3 metres of cloth. This kilt has three buckles and gives the customer flexibility for movement, as this kilt can be altered to a different waist size if your size changes over time. There are also 5 and 7 yard kilt options, however these kilts only have 2 buckles and have little to no room for any alterations to be made at a later date. 

The swing of a kilt

Handmade or Machine-Made?

So is it best to go for a machine or handmade kilt? This is a preference that is completely up to a customer, as the finish of the kilt is not something that you will be able to identify from a distance. With an 8 yard machine-made kilt you will initially have space on the strap for movement. However, you do also have movement of two inches either way for alterations. The strap and buckle can be moved in a further two inches or taken out the same distance; giving you room for any size changes in the future.

 A handmade kilt is completely hand stitched, if you look closely you can see the hundreds of tiny stitches that have been carefully sewn to create your kilt. A handmade kilt is a complete craft in itself, a traditional and dying trade which adds to the authenticity of your kilt outfit. This type of kilt will initially be altered the same way as a machine-made kilt, however there is then the option to get the kilt completely remade to a new waist size if required. A perfect option if you think you may change size drastically, or if you would like to pass it down to someone in the future. The kilt can be completely unpicked back to the full 8 yards of material and then remade to a new size. 

Stitching of an Islay Mist kilt

How much does a kilt cost?

Each of these elements will lead to the answer of perhaps your most important question – how much does a kilt cost? This question is thought to be a simple one, but in fact is more difficult to answer as it completely depends on what you are going for. The starting price for a machine-made kilt is £325, and a fully handmade kilt is starting from £415. These prices are including cloth from our main mill, however a tartan surcharge may incur depending which mill the tartan you choose comes from. There are also options of a 5 yard (starting from £195), and a 7 yard (starting from £265) kilt; these options are online exclusives and will require self-measurements for the purchase of these kilts. 

Close up of a Kilt, Sgian Dubh and Kilt Pin.

All of our kilts are beautifully handcrafted in Scotland, to the highest of quality. If you have any further questions regarding a kilt from MacGregor and MacDuff, please do not hesitate to contact our Communication Team on: [email protected]